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Posts tagged ‘movement’

The Winds of Change

The focus of today’s message is I Ching Hexagram 57 – Wind.

The yin trigram Wind is above. The yin trigram Wind is below.

More than a light breeze?

Much more – an unstoppable movement.

Are we talking of personal development?

There is nothing personal.

What about relationships?

Which relationship?

Yours and mine.

We don’t have one.

But, I relate to you.

In what way?

You are my teacher.

Is that all?

No.

Then, what?

More than I know.

Why?

You’re too far beyond my understanding, at this time.

Yes.

Please explain.

What?

Why relationships are not personal.

Relationships describe connection.

As a bridge?

Yes. And bridges are for crossing.

One way?

No.

Then, we meet halfway?

No.

Then, what?

Relationships are bridges that can unite.

To release duality?

To release the illusion of duality.

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Movement Has No Purpose of its Own

A spirit teacher shares His understanding of timeless wisdom

Contained within I Ching 56 – Travel.

In the order of the hexagrams, Travel follows Abundance (55)

And transforms itself into Wind (57), or has the potential to do so,

If we only travel because of restlessness.

The trigram Fire is above Mountain. Fire is Yin energy

Mountain is yang.

 

Isn’t that curious?

 

What?

 

That yin Fire moves while yang Mountain is placid.

 

Mountains are never placid. A calm exterior can contain

Dynamic energy. Now can we continue with the reading?

 

Please do.

 

Fire moves, or at least has potential to move

Mountains are generally known for their stability.

If we travel from and then return to a mountain,

We can usually be confident that it will be where we left it.

A fire may have moved on and created destruction.

 

What general message would this reading seem to suggest?

 

Travel is only movement if it has no purpose.

 

Cause or Effect – Chicken or Egg

A spirit teacher shares His understanding of timeless wisdom contained within
the symbolic structure of the 64 I Ching hexagrams, which expresses an endless
series of events and situations that each of us will necessarily experience
during our human lifetimes, until we have learned to become aware of our own
self-directed role in creating the illusion of permanence and of our seeming
resistance to accept what is, and to respond without unproductive emotional
or intellectual analysis. When milk is spilled, by whatever cause, we mop it up.

How does cause and effect or chicken and egg fit into such a philosophy of life?

I Ching hexagram 50 – The Cauldron, answers that question.

Then, please explain.

Fire is over Wind. Each are yin and each is receptive to the other, at least
in this situation.

The separate energies of Fire and Wind, in their extremes, can create destruction.
Together, they could bring about disaster. Mental energies are no different than
those of nature, in this respect.

But, a gentle fire and a controlled movement of air can create warmth, boil
water, or heat food.

Enter the Cauldron?

Yes. A cauldron was a large kettle hung over an open fire, before it was
replaced with modern appliances and more controllable sources of heat.

However, the timeless realities exist even within a so-called modern
world. The transfer of energy still requires movement and interaction
between cause and effect.

What is the message that this discussion of fire and wind say to me?

It dares to ask a question concerning our relationship, which you seem
to hesitate to face.

And, that is …?

Who is what?

Fire or Wind?

No.

Cause or effect?

Yes.

Perhaps we each, depending upon the situation, can and do play
either role.

Yes.

Beneath the Surface of Cause and Effect

A Spirit teacher shares His understanding
of the situation expressed by the I Ching
hexagram 56 – Travel.

Fire is over Mountain.

Travel follows abundance (55) and is itself
followed by Wind (57).

There is a time to move forward and a time
when moving is unwise. Fire travels if and
when it can.

If we seek to follow the advice of the text …

And we do, or at least some of us.

Then, how can we know.

What?

When to move and when to resist moving.

Expanded awareness.

Of what?

Of the situation in question.

Do all situations possess a potential
for movement?

Yes, and more.

What more?

The inevitability of movement.

Cause and effect?

Not necessarily, but cause and effect
are more easily understood than
the underlying impetus to continuous
movement.

The underlying impetus?

Yes.

What could it be?

Destiny.

Rising is followed by Exhaustion

Spirit explains I Ching 46 – Rising

Rising follows Gathering in the order
of the hexagrams, and whatever is
gathered or gathers together rises,
at least in quantity.

What about quality?

What about it?

I like to think of rising as expressing
an upward momentum.

It does.

But, how could anything increasing in
negativity express an upward movement?

For example?

The rainy season has begun, or threatens to.

What is negative about a rainy season?

My beloved summer season is over.

It, too, rose until it reached
a predetermined limit to its rising.
Rising is and must be followed by
Exhaustion, as will be the rainy season.

Is there a personal message for me?

Yes. You have been impatient.

Cause and Effect are Interactive

Spirit’s I Ching Way

50 – The Cauldron

Fire over Wind. Yin and Yin interacting. Each is receptive to the other, at least in this situation.

The energies of fire and wind, in their extreme forms, can create destruction on their own. Together, they could bring disaster. Mental energies are no different than those of nature, in this respect.
But, a gentle fire and a controlled movement of air can create welcomed warmth, boil water, or heat food.

A cauldron was a large kettle hung over a fire before it was replaced with modern appliances and more controllable sources of heat.
However, the timeless realities exist even in a so-called modern world. The transfer of energy still requires movement and interaction between cause and effect.

What are you saying to me?

Who is what?

Perhaps there is a two-way interaction.

Yes.

Spirit’s I Ching 57 – Wind

Today’s I Ching reading by Spirit

Wind follows Travel

 

Spirit explains:

 

Travel and Wind each express movement, but each in its own way.

Wind, though variable in force and direction, is limited to movement of

Matter, without capacity to choose what it moves or how far.

 

Travel suggests intentional movement from one place to

Another, or from one condition to another.

 

Another, important difference between Travel and Wind is that

The wind can change direction and revisit where it had once been.

 

Only physical travel allows for return, and even then, never as

One was before moving or being moved.

 

Subjective states of mind, such as thought and emotion, can

Also travel, moved by outer or inner forces, with or without

Personal control.

 

Study, prayer, meditation, and contemplation are, more or less,

Self-directed ways of travel that require intention to direct or

Seek direction in both a physical and non-physical form.

 

What can be both physical and non-physical in form?

 

A lifestyle.

 

 

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